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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 6, 2017 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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hello. this is breakfast, with louise minchin and charlie stayt. donald trump goes face to face with intelligence chiefs after weeks of speculation over hacking. they'll tell the president—elect why they think russia intervened in the us election campaign, as he faces criticism from both sides of the political divide. g row grow up. time to be an adult. you're president. good morning. it's friday, the 6th of january. also this morning: unions say a strike on southern rail will go ahead next week despite a report which says it is safe for train drivers to operate doors. i will try to keep my feet dry all morning at the london boat show, giving us a glimpse into the uk's
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growing leisure boat industry. from small, human powered, two giant super yachts. and it's one of the highlights of the sporting calendar, as the top teams enter the fa cup, and one of the world's most successful managers pep guardiola gets his first taste of its magic tonight. the sounds of stonehenge and why they could reveal some of the secrets of the historic site. and matt has the weather. good morning. will it be the sound of ice scrapers echoing around the south and east today? it is a day of contrast. while some have frosts, temperatures down to —6, for others it is cloudy and wet. the forecast coming up in15 it is cloudy and wet. the forecast coming up in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. the us president—elect donald trump is due to meet intelligence chiefs today, to discuss claims that russia tried to interfere in the american presidential election. he's faced criticism from both republicans and democrats about his approach to
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the allegations, and less than 24—hours before the meeting one of his top intelligence advisers quit his team. dan johnson reports. the three wise men of us intelligence. together in their belief that russian hacking interfered with the presidential election, intending to help donald trump win. hacking was only one part of it. and it also entailed classical propaganda, disinformation. but in the last few hours the president—elect has again questioned thatjudgement. how is the fbi so sure there was hacking, he asked in a tweet, when they didn't even examine the democratic campaign computers allegedly targeted? it campaign computers allegedly targeted ? it is campaign computers allegedly targeted? it is the latest in a long list of online outbursts. first rubbishing intelligence officials before saying his —— he's a big fan,
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then challenging again. the cia said he was expect in a feisty meeting.” am hoping that he will be respectful and professional. respectful of the agency as well as the community and looking forward to a rather robust if not sporty discussion on this issue. there has been more blunt criticism of mr trump's approach from his political enemies. grow up. time to be an adult, you're president. not presidentjust yet, but donald trump's already announced at least two of these men will be replaced when he takes office two weeks today. theresa may is due to hold her first meeting with donald trump, possibly as soon as next month. it's emerged that two of the prime minister's closest aides went to washington in december to hold discussions with mr trump's team. our political correspondent, eleanor garnier, joins us now from westminster.
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tell us more about the meeting. it will be a significant moment, as is any meeting between the uk prime minister and the new us president. but theresa may's relationship with the white house is especially important, as she tries to reshape the uk's role, in taking britain out of the eu. archie won't be the first uk politician to meet donald trump. that was nigel farage and last night he was boasting that he will be at mr trump's inauguration. but having sent her two most trusted and senior aides highlights the importance that theresa may and number 10 place on establishing a strong relationship with mr trump. establishing a strong relationship with mrtrump. i establishing a strong relationship with mr trump. i think that meeting between her aides and mr trump's top tea m between her aides and mr trump's top team might have been a little bit awkward. her two chiefs of staff
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have publicly criticised mr trump in the staff. one said that donald trump isa the staff. one said that donald trump is a chump and the other said american politics was depressing enough before trump took off. clearly building at a few bridges hasn't gone amiss. thanks for an much. we will look ahead to that meeting between donald trump and his intelligence advisers a little later this morning. the failure to predict the financial crisis of 2008 was a michael fish moment for economists, the bank of england's chief economist has said. andy haldane compared financial forecasts to the famously inaccurate reassurances given by the bbc weatherman ahead of the uk's great storm of 1987. mr haldane said the profession was "to some degree in crisis" following the crash and the brexit vote. the train drivers‘ union aslef says it will go ahead with three days of strike action on the southern rail network next week. that's despite a report by the independent rail regulator claiming that trains
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with driver—operated doors, the source of the dispute, are safe. ben bland has more. a busy commuter line brought to a standstill in december when southern rail's drivers and conductors went on strike. passengers on the railway between london, surrey, east sussex and west sussex intuit more than 2a strikes last year and they are in for more. the drivers union aslef insists it will go ahead with 324—hour strikes next week. on tuesday the 10th, wednesday the 11th and friday the 13th. the dispute is about this. southern wants its drivers to take over closing the doors, a job currently done by the on—board guard. the union says it is less safe and threatens jobs in the long run. but afterfurther less safe and threatens jobs in the long run. but after further review the regulator, the office of rail and road, has confirmed it regards the plans as safe. why don't
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intervene? in light of that report the transport secretary chris grayling says the strike should be called off. he also wants nationwide safety guidelines on the way trains are dispatched. at aslef disputes the report and says its members will book out next week. if that goes ahead southern rail says no train will run on tuesday, wednesday and friday. lenders of both aslef and the rmt, the rail maritime and transport union, are also planning three further strikes late in the month. a lack of funding to improve forensic science isjeopardising the integrity of the criminal justice system in england and wales, according to a watchdog. the forensic science regulator says it's also concerned about the processing of dna samples taken from suspects and victims of crime. the national police chiefs council says it has secured extra funding to respond to the challenges faced by the service. bed blocking in the nhs in england has become significantly worse in mental health trusts than in acute hospitals,
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according to new research. ministers say they will be spending £400 million over the next four years, to ensure mental health teams can provide support to people in their homes. michael buchanan has more. oliver lang helps his father run a small post office in norfolk. in 2014, the 27—year—old was detained under the mental health act. he spent several weeks in a psychiatric unit but even when he was well enough to leave he couldn't. delays in arranging suitable support in the community meant he spent a further two months unnecessarily in hospital. ijust felt like i was in danger in there because a lot happens in hospital and i felt like if someone attacked me i would have to defend myself, but if i did defend myself and hurt someone then they'd say i was a danger to the public still and they would keep me locked up for longer, so i was trying to be whiter than white. the latest figures show more than 200,000 bed days were lost in the nhs in england as a whole in october 2016 due
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to delayed discharges. for nhs trusts specialising in physical healthcare, that represented a 30% rise on the previous 12 months. but for those trusts most closely focused on mental health and learning disabilities, the increase was 56%. the analysis was carried out for this former care minister who says the figures show that mental health patients are being discriminated against. it means there's a shortage of community psychiatric nurses, a shortage of support services like detox facilities and a shortage in social care, which i think has hit people with mental ill—health disproportionately hard. ministers say they're spending £400 million over the next four years to ensure mental health teams can provide more support to people in their homes. michael buchanan, bbc news. stalkers will face longer jail terms under a drive to toughen punishments. the maximum sentence in england and wales will rise from five to ten years. the ministry ofjustice says the plans will help ensure the punishment reflects the damaging
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impact stalking has on victims. the funeral will take place today of the man who was shot dead by west yorkshire police on monday. 28—year—old yassar yaqub died after officers stopped a car he was in on a motorway slip road near huddersfield. a man arrested as part of the police operation will appear in court later charged with firearms offences. the actor om puri, who starred in the british comedy east is east, has died in india. he was 66 and is reported to have had a heart attack. om puri was awarded an honorary obe for his contribution to the british film industry in 2004. william lindesay has been obsessed with the great wall of china since seeing it in a school atlas as a child in england. and last year he embarked on an epicjourney, leaving his home on merseyside, to fulfil a lifelong ambition to film the wall in its entirety from the air, using a drone. his travels have taken him all over
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north china and even to mongolia. you can see some you can see some of you can see some of the extraordinary images he has filmed. that looks absolutely stunning. a baby elephant in thailand has been forced to overcome her fear of water by learning to walk again using hydrotherapy. meet five—month—old fah jam, who lost part of her foot in a trap laid by villagers. she'll need up to three months of treatment to help strengthen the muscles in her leg, but her vet says she's already showing signs of improvement. despite most elephants loving the water, fahjam was a little nervous going into the water. ican i can see why she is a little bit nervous. a p pa re ntly nervous. apparently the treatment is working and it is ongoing. lovely. good morning, everyone. good morning, mike.
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it works for footballers and sport stars as it takes the weight off. anyway, talking of football, one of the highlights of the sporting calendar anywhere in the world, the fa cup third round. the giants of all go against these teams that many people have never heard of. really i suppose you can say it has more unlikely heroes and places you've never heard of any fairy tale. that's what makes it so special. but it kicks off tonight with one of the most famous managers in football, but he has never tasted winning the fa cup. west ham host manchester city in the first of 32 ties this weekend. for city manager pep guardiola, it's a new experience. he's never been involved in the cup and he says he's looking forward to a special match tonight. elsewhere, hull city have appointed marco silva in their bid to avoid relegation from the premier league. the portuguese, who's nicknamed
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the ‘mini—mourinho', has signed a deal until the end of the season, after mike phelan was sacked on tuesday. sir andy murray is through to the semi—finals of the qatar open after a hard fought victory over spain's nicolas almagro yesterday. he'll face thomas berdych in the last four and could face novak djokovic in tomorrow's final. and the welsh rugby union say they've done all they can to bring leigh halfpenny back from toulon. the wales and british and irish lions full—back‘s contract with the french club expires at the end of the season. if you've ever wondered what eddie jones's. looks like, i'd will show you ina jones's. looks like, i'd will show you in a moment. can you do it now? shall we break protocol? what gets me is sport stars have small dogs. andy murray, djokovic, they both have small dogs. eddiejones... he is here with his little dog, annie. so sweet.
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what he/she? some sort of collie. —— what is she? if you base that on the premise of owners looking like their dogs, not much going on there. no, a lot of hair, not so much! maybe it is to do with portability. indeed. travel a lot and less danger of injury. if you have a huge alsatian or rottweiler and it has an injury potential you will be out of the next match! i think it looks like a happy —— papillon but i am not an expert. they are talking about this michael fish moment here. the telegraph film review. five stars to the jackie kennedy by pic. this is natalie portman in the title
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role. patients also to be diagnosed by robots and a new nhs service. the times, a couple of stories. diesel pumping out more than twice the toxic gas of lorries and buses of the same age, according to new analysis. the other story is about the white house and the announcement that theresa may will be visiting the white house sometime in february. relatively soon. that is the habitat and start building relationships. the guardian talking about this man who has found it impossible to get a uk passport, despite the fact that he was born educated. i saw this yesterday. i don't know if you have seen people walking through supermarket in dressing gowns. i don't have a problem with it. apparently this is a photograph
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taken actually in a supermarket near here in salford. some young ladies walking through the supermarket in their pyjamas. some people were offended by it. some people are really deeply offended. lots of other shops will apparently give them a warning, tesco, but other shops say you can come to our shop as long as you were not wearing your birthday suit. i would not even notice what other people were wearing when i go to get some beans. i have definitely gone to the shops in slippers. i don't even have slippers! i have been there in a onesie. in a onesie! there was nobody there. it was a fox onesie. it makes you look with a fag. i don't wear it very often. -- makes you look fat. what were you buying?
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milk and a toilet roll, mostly. marvellous. i bet matt is dreading the question now. do you want to just equip the weather orjoin in the inappropriate things at the supermarket conversation?” the inappropriate things at the supermarket conversation? i have never gone to a supermarket in my pyjamas or a fox outfit. this morning you might need a slightly warmer onesie across the south and east. it is another morning to scrape frost of the car. a big temperature contrast compared to yesterday. these temperatures started yesterday widely below freezing. oxfordshire and greater london still with a widespread frost, but elsewhere, especially cou nty frost, but elsewhere, especially county down and the scottish borders, a big temperature boost. cou nty borders, a big temperature boost. county down around 40 degrees warmer thanit county down around 40 degrees warmer than it was this time yesterday
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morning. —— 14 degrees. that is because of a change of weather condition. cloud spilling through the night and some rain as well. air coming from the atlantic is bringing lovely sunny conditions yesterday and squeezing into the south—east, but bringing the rain. wettest in northern ireland. the rain has been turning heavier of the last few hours. splashes of rain and the odd spot of rain and drizzle into western parts of england and wales. for the next few hours, rain continues in northern ireland. same for western parts of scotland. heaviest in the far south—west. a bit of sunshine coming your way. after initial breaks in the cloud to the east of the pennines, where there is a frost, temperatures will rise. cloud was built in and then it goes across western parts. more of a bruce poon yesterday. the south and east, a widespread frost. the odd patch of mist and freezing fog. if
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you are out on the road, you will need to scrape your windscreen. once the fog clears, the brightest weather throughout the day. sunny spells continuing. but the sunny blue skies when he saw yesterday. a few hints of sunshine at times for northern scotland, but the rain is as in northern ireland and the heaviest rain into the afternoon for parts of northern england and north and west wales. quite a murky round bequests. 11 degrees in both fast and fouror bequests. 11 degrees in both fast and four orfive bequests. 11 degrees in both fast and fourorfive in bequests. 11 degrees in both fast and four orfive in norwich —— the coasts. the rainy weather makes it would east anglia tonight. lots of cloud for england and wales. very misty. frost free into the start of saturday. across scotland and northern ireland, clear skies, and from northern scotland, the chance of frost into the start of the weekend. the brightest weatherfor saturday will be northern scotland with sunny spells. elsewhere, most places will be dry. a lot of cloud. very misty over the hills of northern england and wales. the odd
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spot of rain and drizzle around as well. temperatures in northern scotla nd well. temperatures in northern scotland around five or six at best. ten or 11 scotland around five or six at best. ten or11 in scotland around five or six at best. ten or 11 in the south. the same sort of conditions as well into sunday. thank you. from small boat—builders to glamorous super yachts, business is booming for the uk's leisure boating industry. figures out today show that its grown for the fifth year in a row. coletta's finding her sea legs at the london boat show for us. it looks lovely. they put that pool in especially. yes, it is lovely. this is the london boat show. there isa this is the london boat show. there is a real river outside, but we are using the slightly warmer this version, and intellect. there are about 400 boats and display. it is a big industry. that is the leisure boat industry, not cruise boats. smaller ones from the very small to be big in fancy yachts use it. the industry is worth about £3 billion to the uk. it is growing. not hugely, but by about 1% each year
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for the last five years. it employs a significant number of people. with a significant number of people. with a third orfourth biggest in terms of employment in the world when it comes to leisure boat industry. some of the boats are very small and human powered, like these guys. rob, is ita human powered, like these guys. rob, is it a nice day for a paddle? excellent. nice and warm in there. i will try to keep my own feet dry. i will try to keep my own feet dry. i will nip in and talk to pip, who is in charge. this is going very fast, watersports. yes. we have the entry—level boating, the kayaking, stand—up paddle board, that is on the increase. that is what we are finding. thank you. we will hear lots more throughout the programme. i will head down to the cp at at the other end as well. -- superyacht. they are obviously experts because no one has fallen in. not yet. i'm
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sure it can be arranged. we will be back there later. it looks like fun. like a little machine, in little surf machine. brilliant. it's a time of year when darker days and financial pressures can cause anxiety and depression for some people, and it's over the winter months that health professionals say they see an increase in mental health referrals. one type of support that's on offer is internet—based therapy, that involves chatting to someone and getting advice online. breakfast‘s graham satchell has been to meet one man who's benefited from this way of treating depression. i struggle. i istruggle. i have i struggle. i have struggled. istruggle. i have struggled. not i struggle. i have struggled. not a time of year i enjoy at all. when i expected to be i'm supposed to be, and struggling. christmas and new year is a difficult time panic. he has lived with anxiety and depression for many years.” has lived with anxiety and depression for many years. i worry about everything. i worried about
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this interview. i have been since i found out it was happening. my natural instinct is to worry about everything. i constantly thinking and analysing everything going on around me. istruggle and analysing everything going on around me. i struggle to make decisions, some of them really simple decisions. when i will have supper, for example. i can spend an awful long time in the supermarket just trying to get through that kind of thing. nick went to his gp for help. she offered him a series of online therapy sessions. it is a typed conversation with a trained therapist they never made. typed conversation with a trained therapist they never madem typed conversation with a trained therapist they never made. it is quite strange getting started —— meet. you talk about how you are feeling, what you are thinking. there is a pause while the other person, your therapist, is waiting to respond. and just writing something down, which i have never done before and were scared to do it, ifound done before and were scared to do it, i found it done before and were scared to do it, ifound it was done before and were scared to do it, i found it was a safe way to do that. it had quite a profound effect
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for me personally. as well as the convenience of this kind of therapy, advocates say doing it helps some people to open up. i found it really liberating in a way i was not expecting. i shared some pretty challenging things from my perspective, anyway. it is surprisingly how much more information on the patient has been able to share using the system. online therapy on nhs is normally delivered by private companies. critics say it is just a cheap way of providing a service that should be face—to—face. but the therapist to do it say the success rate is the same and the process is surprising. when you put a computer between an experienced therapist and patient, all sorts of things can happen. usually, in my experience, those problem statements, the first thing they say to their therapists, take a little bit of getting at. here we
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see it occurring right there in the first session. that is really important, because once you know what the problem is, you can start the treatment. talking to a therapist online won't work for everyone, but it has helped make.” guess it gave me a way to cope —— nick. i was really struggling to cope with what i was thinking, and it gave me a real way to cope. cope with what i was thinking, and it gave me a real way to copem can be especially hard this time of yearfor can be especially hard this time of year for people. that was nick martin speaking to breakfast‘s graham satchell. let us know what you think as well. he's been dubbed britain's grumpiest shopkeeper after charging customers 50 pence to browse his second—hand book store. but with small retailers being squeezed by high street giants on one side and internet shopping on the other, you might think that steve bloom is making a brave stand. fiona trott has been to meet him. it is hard being an independent
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retailer, leave it like that. a charming market town. beyond these stores is a bookshop, and browsers are infora stores is a bookshop, and browsers are in for a surprise. have you bought anything here before? no. we came here about five units go. bought anything here before? no. we came here about five units gom bought anything here before? no. we came here about five units go. it is 50p to come in. and then between you, not age, and if you buy something, you get it back. not everybody likes it, and certain words have been exchanged which you will not find in any of these books. it is my shop, my little world. i run it. i'm comfortable with feeling the people who come in and appreciate it, and i do feel it is my right. people say to me, you should not be doing this. well, you get charged all the time for all sorts of things. if there is a book
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fair, a craft fair, a car park. to i lets. fair, a craft fair, a car park. toilets. it is not so ridiculous as people say it is. but the parish council says it is embarrassed. it has received over 20 complaints. when people who are unaware of the charge i challenged by him to pay it, he then is rude and offensive. it spreads like wildfire. the damage to our reputation in the wider world is quite considerable. the building where steve's shop is based is run by trustees and they say his management style does not constitute a public nuisance. their lawyers have told him so. in the meantime, steve has agreed to put up a sign which will tell customers what to expect. faaiuga! charge 50p and some people do what you going to supermarkets with your pyjamas on —— there you go! when you hear steve explain his
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thinking, it sort of makes sense. you can understand why people are offended as well. let us know what you think via the usual means and online as well. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm alice salfield. london's status as a global hub cannot be taken for granted post brexit, according to a new report by london first. it says the government must take steps to reduce uncertainty for the capital by investing in housing, skills training and transport. it also recommends changing the visa system to ensure the capital can retain skilled migrants. one of the country's best known nightclubs, fabric, is to re—open tonight after reaching a new licensing deal about drugs and security. it was made to close in september after the deaths of two teenagers who'd taken illegal substances there. islington council said at the time
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the club had a "culture of drug use" which staff were "incapable of controlling". fabric bosses say from now on, under 19s won't be allowed in, and anyone found with drugs will be banned for life. a long—neglected edwardian lido in berkshire is to re—open following an extensive refurbishment. the kings meadow baths in reading closed in the 1970s and fell into disrepair. the grade two building has now been renamed thames lido, and is expected to be open to the public this summer as a completely re—imaged attraction. it will have a spa and restaurant alongside a chlorine free pool. it will have a spa and restaurant alongside a chlorine free poolm is totally preserved as it was, but now it is protected by all of this surrounding glass. so behind the glass wall, this is the set out, the layout. let's have a look at the travel situation now. good service on the trains, aside from southern's ongoing
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disruption because of industrial action. the a1 remains closed at upper holloway. it's closed until the 16th for bridge works. in deptford, haddo street is closed after a large fire on a boat last night. let's have a check on the weather now. another frosty start the day, scraping your windscreen today. today they won't be as much sunshine. it will cloud over as the day goes on. patches of freezing fog through the course of the morning possibly causing hazards to the morning rush hour. most likely to stick around for much of the morning to what south—eastern areas of the capital. we will see cloud push in for the north—west did a course of the day. gradually turning cloudy and feeling a touch milder then yesterday. 5— seven degrees beehive. we should stay dry and to the evening. then we will see rain was down from the north—west. most of it
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tends to be light and patchy antennae to drizzle by the time we get through tomorrow morning. mist tonight with overnight lows of around four orfive. tonight with overnight lows of around four or five. over the weekend, it will stay mostly dry. there could still be outbreaks of drizzle perhaps on saturday, and certainly a lot of cloud as well. lyrically, looking milder. nine or 10 celsius. in reality, it will not feel that pleasant because of the globe grey cloud. at least the winds alike. it will turn briefly into the start of next week with rain at times. —— winds are light. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. hello. this is breakfast, with louise minchin and charlie stayt. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning: as donald trump prepares to meet top intelligence chiefs to discuss the allegations of russia hacking, we'll ask one a former diplomat who worked in the white house what the latest row tells us about the future president. is it fair to charge
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customers to browse? after a shop owner receives complaints for charging 50p to enter his bookshop, we ask whether independent retailers should be allowed to make their own rules. the real mr and mrs of strictly. they've even opened their own dance school, but we'll hear why kevin still tries to copy karen's moves when they go out. the cliftons join us after 8:30am. all that still to come. but now a summary of this morning's main news. the us president—elect donald trump is due to meet intelligence chiefs today, to discuss claims that russia tried to interfere in the american presidential election. he's faced criticism from both republicans and democrats about his approach to the allegations, and less than 24—hours before the meeting one of his top intelligence advisers quit his team. dan johnson reports.
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the three wise men of us intelligence. together in their belief that russian hacking interfered with the presidential election, intending to help donald trump win. the hacking was only one part of it. and it also entailed classical propaganda, disinformation, fake news. but in the last few hours, the president—elect has again questioned theirjudgement. how is the fbi so sure there was hacking, he asked in a tweet, when they didn't even examine the democratic campaign computers allegedly targeted ? it's the latest in a long list of online outbursts. first rubbishing intelligence officials before saying he's a big fan, then challenging them once again. the cia director said he was expecting a feisty meeting. i am hoping that he is going to be respectful of the professional.
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respectful of the intelligence agency as well as the community, and i'm looking forward to a rather robust, if not sporty, discussion on this issue. there has been more blunt criticism of mr trump's approach from his political enemies. grow up. time to be an adult, you're president. not presidentjust yet, but donald trump's already announced at least two of these men will be replaced when he takes office two weeks today. theresa may is due to hold her first meeting with donald trump, possibly as soon as next month. it's emerged that two of the prime minister's closest aides went to washington in december to hold discussions with mr trump's team. the failure to predict the financial crisis of 2008 was a ‘michael fish‘ moment for economists, the bank of england's chief economist has said. andy haldane compared financial forecasts to the famously inaccurate reassurances given by the bbc weatherman ahead
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of the uk's great storm of 1987. mr haldane said the profession was "to some degree in crisis", following the crash and the brexit vote. the train drivers‘ union aslef says it will go ahead with three days of strike action on the southern rail network next week. that‘s despite a report by the independent rail regulator claiming that trains with driver—operated doors, the source of the dispute, are safe. transport secretary chris grayling says the strikes are politically motivated. we will be talking to him on brea kfast we will be talking to him on breakfast later. stalkers will face longerjail terms as part of a drive to toughen punishments. the maximum sentence in england and wales will rise from five to ten years. the ministry ofjustice says the bans will help ensure the punishment reflects the damaging impact stalking has on victims. bed blocking in the nhs in england has become significantly worse in mental health trusts than in acute hospitals, according to new research.
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while physical health care saw a 30% rise in bed blocking on the previous year, mental health trusts experienced a 56% increase. ministers said they will spend £400 million over the next four years to ensure mental health teams can provide support to people in their homes. the funeral will take place today of the man who was shot dead by west yorkshire police on monday. 28—year—old yassar yaqub died after officers stopped a car he was in on a motorway slip road near huddersfield. a man arrested as part of the police operation will appear in court later charged with firearms offences. the actor om puri, who starred in the british comedy east is east, has died in india. he was 66 and is reported to have had a heart attack. om puri was awarded an honorary obe for his contribution to the british film industry in 2004. those are the main stories. mike‘s
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here. good morning. reflecting on the magic of the fa cup. it is the one time of the year when we am mentioning the likes of the great names, along with the less so. talking about city, pep guardiola gets a first taste of the fa cup as his side travel to west ham tonight. it is live on bbc one. the third round of the fa cup are under way. the first match of the weekend is an all premier league tie at the london stadium where west ham host manchester city. guardiola has achieved many things in the game already but he‘s never been involved in an fa cup tie. what i hear before, it is special because the lower teams can beat the big teams. that‘s why it is so fascinating. it happens in the cup
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as well. that‘s why i am looking forward. but of course it is tough, it will be luck of the draw. a big game for us and a big game for them, the fa cup. it is for the fans of course and i am sure they will put a very strong team tomorrow, because it's a big chance for them to get a trophy. hull city have appointed the former sporting lisbon and olympiakos coach marco silva as their new manager as they attempt to avoid relegation from the premier league. the 39—year—old portuguese, who‘s nicknamed the ‘mini mourinho‘, has signed a contract until the end of the season. he led olympiakos to the greek title last season. hull are currently bottom of the table. your hammock kaunda has been beaten
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in the semifinals of the sheds and -- in china. sir andy murray is through to the qatar open semi—finals after beating spain‘s nicolas almagro in straight sets yesterday. but the briton didn‘t have things all his own way in doha. the first set went to a tie break, which murray won 7—6. it was almost as tight in the second, but at 5—5 the world number one broke his opponent and served out the victory. he‘ll face tomas berdych next. the welsh rugby union say it‘s made the best offer it can to bring leigh halfpenny back from toulon. the wales full—back‘s contract with the french club expires at the end of this season. cardiff blues and scarlets are thought to be interested in signing him on a national dual contract, with the welsh rugby union paying 60% of his salary. we remember him paddling down to the medals in the summer, but now
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richard hounslow has retired from the sport. the 35—year—old won two silver medals in the canoe double with partner david florence at london 2012 and rio 2016. he said it had been a true honour to represent his country at the highest level. he has been canoeing since he can remember, so at 35 you can understand why he has had enough of sitting in those tiny boats, hurtling down the rapids. he said he loved some of it, but hated some of it. and he isn‘t going to retire? everybody is retiring this week! i don‘t think so! the quality of forensic science work in england and wales is at "significant risk" because of funding problems, according to the regulator. in her annual report, gillian tully also expressed concerns about the way dna samples are taken and processed from suspects and victims of crime. she joins us live now from our southampton studio. good morning. thanks forjoining us.
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this is the third time, we are trying to count, in three years that concerns have been raised about forensic work. what‘s going on and what‘s being done to change it? first of all it is worth putting it in context. the vast majority of forensic science work is done well in this country. at myjob is to make sure that it is all done well and to set a quality standards for that. what i‘m finding is that i am coming up against both police workers and small companies that say they can‘t afford to meet the standards i have said, so that‘s clearly a concern, because it is important that we don‘t drop the standards, but that we make sure that the service is done properly. we looked at one case where an investigation had been compromised. can you tell us what happened and how it may have happened? in that case it looks like there was contamination between two different people who were examined in on
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sexual assault. i have to say that most of these examinations are carried out extremely professionally, but the dna methods we use now are extremely sensitive and sell a great deal of care needs to be taken to avoid contamination and we treat any incident where there has been contamination very seriously, but we treat it as a learning opportunity. so we use it to make sure that all other referral centres learn from those mistakes and get better each time.“ centres learn from those mistakes and get better each time. if things like that happen what are the risks? resume a bleak the case and there? —— presumably. resume a bleak the case and there? -- presumably. other than the forensic science in that case i don‘t know anything else about the case, so i wouldn‘t be able to comment on specifically what happened in that case. i know the sample was ta ken happened in that case. i know the sample was taken for forensic analysis and it would be able to be used any more, but i can‘t really say more widely. you said that police forces and private companies
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have been telling you they can‘t afford to address the standards you‘ve been talking about. what do you‘ve been talking about. what do you think needs to be done?” you‘ve been talking about. what do you think needs to be done? i think most forensic science is done... is commissioned by the police and it is either done by their own laboratories in house or it is done by commercial companies. virtually all of those commercial companies are already meeting the standards and police are working hard to get to where they need to be and they are doing a great deal of work towards that. but i am hearing from practitioners on the ground that they are just not getting the level of resource they need to make sure that they do meet the timelines for achieving the standards. so i think what they really need is the support from the very top of their organisations to make sure that they have the support they need. how important are forensic stee you think in modern—day policing? —— forensics do you think. there is
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very little data on how important and valuable forensics is to policing, but we know that when a crime scene sample is added to the national dna data base crime scene sample is added to the national dna database that there is an over 60% chance that there will bea an over 60% chance that there will be a match reported back from that. so police will have a name, as a lead to take them further in the crime. so it can be extremely important. we should say we have a statement from the national police chiefs council. the basis of it is that the police service is committed to achieving accreditation and improving standards of forensic science. you‘re watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: less than 24 hours before he‘s due to receive a detailed briefing from intelligence chiefs, donald trump‘s top intelligence advisers quits his team. the train drivers‘ union aslef says it will go ahead with three days of strike action on the southern rail network next week. let‘s have a look at the weather.
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good morning. it looks lovely. good morning. it is another day of blue skies and frost for some this morning. some are starting the day and lovely and sunny but for others it is not. the grey skies with this and there will be outbreaks of rain. that has opened up the contrasts in temperatures. —6 across some parts of the south—east where skies are plus eight in northern ireland, where this time yesterday, we were at minus five. a huge change for you, we do have cloud and rain. milder air, almost cold air, with others through the weekend. the real chill will be for the balkans, with a high of around minus 12. temperatures on the rise in the next
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few hours. still frosty the morning commute. a few dense fog patches to slow your journey this morning. commute. a few dense fog patches to slow yourjourney this morning. for the west, temperatures lifting above freezing. in milder start for cornwall and west wales. more of a breeze with patchy rain and drizzle and turning down in the north—west of england quickly. frost for the pennines. that was bogey start to lift as the cloud spills over. patchy rain across scotland. wet the northern ireland with heavy bursts of rain. the north—east of scotland avoid the rain. hazy sunshine at times. not too bad for scotland. the wetter weather will push southwards and attends wet across northern england especially west of the pennines and towards wales. the heaviest bursts in the hills. south and east, it stays dry and reasonably sunny. temperatures of four degrees in norwich compared to 11 in belfast this afternoon, where the rain will gradually ease. it does leave a legacy of low cloud. as the rain pushes towards the south
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through tonight, it will lift temperatures across southern areas. mist tonight in prospect. most will be frost free. misty on the hills. the clearest skies will be northern scotland. a touch of frost to take us scotland. a touch of frost to take us into the start of the weekend. the best of the sunshine will be on saturday in scotland. misty around the hills with the odd spot of rain and drizzle. damp to the english channel. dry into the afternoon and some hints of sunshine at times to the east of high ground. temperatures tomorrow, a big boost across the south, double figures. five or six in the north—east of scotland. but you have sunshine to compensate. into sunday, most bases drought once again. a lot of cloud around. the best chances of sunshine for scotland and the north—east of england. still temperatures are up on what we have today, and still in double figures as we finish the weekend. a day of contrast today and
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slightly cold weekend on the way. thank you. we are about to do something that looked really fun.” love this. maybe not ideal weather for selling. we will go to the london boat show this morning. —— sailing. what is this machine? i love it. we have lost the machine and now we can see a kayak. this little thing is a seabob. welcome to the london boat show. i‘m here because the uk has a growing industry but you may not have thought much about. it is the pleasure boat industry. rob is one of the guys doing demonstrations for the next couple of days. you have a new toy. we only got our hands on it this morning. we have a bird of demonstrations going on all through the day. we have loads of brilliant agreement to play with. we are getting used to it and seeing if we
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can find getting used to it and seeing if we canfind our getting used to it and seeing if we can find our feet on it. you have a practice and i‘ll come back later. this is a growing industry, about 1% every year for the last five years. the men in charge of the boat show is howard. there are 400 boats on display from the very small to be much bigger. which end is growing faster of this industry? at the london boat show, you will see the whole spectrum of the industry. it isa whole spectrum of the industry. it is a showcase from canoes up to super yachts. but the luxury powerboat sector and boating tourism have had a resurgence over recent yea rs. across have had a resurgence over recent years. across the industry, we are doing quite well. we are in a nice position in the uk as an island nation. nobody is very far from what. wherever you lift, you are not farfrom what. wherever you lift, you are not far from the coast or a waterway, like the canal network or the thames. we are an island nation and the british people love getting on water. this is how you can find out where to do it. people are spending
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a lot in this industry. when you talk about uk boatbuilding, you may be picturing boats like this beauty in the background. beautiful wooden sailing boats. but the industry has changed a lot recently. we are getting into the more high—tech and the things with much more high school jobs. i will attempt the things with much more high schooljobs. i will attempt to board this boat, and you canjoin me. hop on board. phoebe is with us this morning. good morning. this is clearly a boat that gusts a pretty penny. it is an expensive hobby —— costs. we are finding people are trying to add experiences into their holidays. people could maybe rent a boat to go on the rivers or the british waterways or overseas. cruising in general is growing. but expedition cruises and when people go to places like the arctic or antarctica, that is increasing. a tour operator has lodged a pacific river cruise brochure because water—based activities are increasing. in the year after the
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olympics, there must be an upsurge in blotting and selling in general. we have even seen a company launch and airbnb type of rental for a cabin ona and airbnb type of rental for a cabin on a boat or with their captain to take you around and have your own adventure. we have stand—up paddle boarding, kayak holidays. everything water—based is really big. brilliant. we can catch up with rob and see how he is getting on with his new toy. it is essentially a remote surfboard. not sure if you can see he is actually controlling this thing in his right hand. so far so good? this thing in his right hand. so far so good ? looks this thing in his right hand. so far so good? looks impressive anyway. look at this. absolutely professional. slight wobble towards the end. that is what we were hoping for, a nice little spice. more from us for, a nice little spice. more from us from the london boat show throughout the programme. -- splash. thank you very much. i destruct my pen, sorry. its stones are world famous — and no one knows exactly
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why its there, but now there‘s a theory that the sound of stonehenge could unlock some its hidden history. it is fascinating. one archaeologist has taken up the challenge of recreating what the acoustics of the ruins would have been like 3000 years ago — and he says it could reveal why the site was so important. our arts correspondent david sillito reports. wind blows eerily people have been coming here for at least 4000—5000 years, so we‘re walking in the feet of history. when the wind blows, some people say they hear a strange hum. thomas hardy wrote about it in tess of the d‘urbervilles, and doctor rupert till is convinced the sound of stonehenge is part of its magic. you hear between this beat a little echo.
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taps the problem is this isjust a fragment of the sound people would have heard 4000 years ago. i met the site‘s historian, susan greening. so, this is the front door of stonehenge we‘re going through right now? that‘s right, yes, and we are coming into the central space now. it does change a little bit, doesn‘t it? it does, you have the feeling of being enclosed within a space. and that‘s with many of the stones having gone. what we‘re looking at today is the ruin of stonehenge. many stones have been taken away from the site, many have fallen down, lots have been eroded, they‘re covered in lichen. it would‘ve been a completely different atmosphere, wouldn‘t it? yes, it would. however, rupert tell has announced... what this new technology offers is a possibility,
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a chance to, well, return back and see and also hear what this place used to look like in the past. we have constructed it by rebuilding stonehenge digitally and rebuilding the acoustics of the space as it would have been when all of the stones were here. so, how different is the old sound to the sound we have today? well, if i tap it strong now, you will hear a little bit of an echo. when all of the stones are put in place, there is a much more powerful sense of enclosure, a slight reverberation, more echo, and it changes more as you walk around. and the reason he is convinced ancient people were interested in sound is because of his work on caves. hundreds of metres underground they found ancient instruments
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and human marks on certain stalactites. stalactites that are musical. i9, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25. plays notes on stalactites so today it‘s just ruin beside a city road, a chance to say goodbye to the 21st century and experience the last sound of stonehenge. strangely fascinating. it sounds like a creaking date at the end. isn‘t it weird? —— gate. coming up on breakfast: it‘s been tried in sweden — but could a 6—hour working day take off over here?
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we find out what happened when staff at one uk company tried giving up 9—5 and asking whether working fewer hours for the same pay could actually make people more productive. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i‘m alice salfield. london‘s status as a global hub cannot be taken for granted post brexit, according to a new report by london first. it says the government must take steps to reduce uncertainty for the capital by investing in housing, skills training and transport. it also recommends changing the visa system to ensure the capital can retain skilled migrants. the organisation said leaving the eu also presented new opportunities to the city, but other investment was required. one of the country‘s best known nightclubs, fabric, is to re—open tonight, after reaching a new licensing deal about drugs and security. it was made to close in september after two 18—year—olds died after taking ecstasy there. islington council said at the time
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the club had a "culture of drug use" which staff were "incapable of controlling". fabric bosses say from now on, under 19s won‘t be allowed in, and anyone found with drugs will be banned for life. a long—neglected edwardian lido in berkshire is to re—open following an extensive refurbishment. the kings meadow baths in reading closed in the 1970s and fell into disrepair. the grade two building has now been renamed thames lido, and is expected to re—open this summer with a spa and restaurant alongside a chlorine—free pool. it is totally preserved as it was, but now it is protected by all of this surrounding glass. so behind the glass wall is the old set out, the old layout. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. starting with the tubes —
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all good except for a part closure on tfl rail between brentwood and shenfield. that‘s until late may for improvement works. the a1 remains closed at upper holloway. it‘s closed until the 16th for bridge works. now here‘s elizabeth rizzini with the weather. good morning. another frosty start to the day, scraping your windscreen today. today there won‘t be as much sunshine. it will cloud over as the day goes on. patches of freezing fog through the course of the morning possibly causing hazards to the morning rush hour. most likely to stick around for much of the morning towards south—eastern areas of the capital. we will see cloud push in for the north—west through the course of the day. gradually turning cloudy and feeling a touch milder then yesterday. 5—7 degrees the high. we should stay dry into the evening. then we will see rain down from the north—west. most of it tends to be light and patchy, leading to drizzle by the time we get through tomorrow morning. mild tonight with overnight lows of around four or five.
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over the weekend, it will stay mostly dry. there could still be outbreaks of drizzle perhaps on saturday, and certainly a lot of cloud as well. generally, looking milder. nine or 10 celsius. in reality, it will not feel that pleasant because of the low grey cloud. at least the winds are light. it will turn briefly into the start of next week with rain at times. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. this is breakfast, with louise minchin and charlie stayt. donald trump goes face to face with intelligence chiefs after weeks of speculation over hacking. they‘ll tell the president—elect why they think russia intervened in the us election campaign, as he faces criticism from both sides of the political divide. grow up. time to be an adult. you‘re president. good morning.
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it‘s friday, the 6th of january. also this morning: psychiatric units experience worse delays than acute hospitals in england. i‘m at the london boat show where nothing is going to go wrong but i‘m talking about the uk leisure boat industry, it‘s worth £3 billion a yearand boat industry, it‘s worth £3 billion a year and it‘s growing. and it‘s one of the highlights of the sporting calendar, as the top teams enter the fa cup, and one of the world‘s most successful managers pep guardiola gets his first taste of its magic tonight. buy a book or have a browse, we‘ll talk about the business owner whose been charging customers just to come into his shop. and i do feel it‘s my right. people
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who say to me you shouldn‘t be doing this, well, you get charged all the time for all sorts of things. and matt has the weather. good morning. your forecast comes free of charge this morning but for some it will be a morning of scraping ice of the car once again but big contrasts for some compare with yesterday, for some, cloud and rain on the way. the forecast coming up in15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. the us president—elect donald trump is due to meet intelligence chiefs today, to discuss claims that russia tried to interfere in the american presidential election. he‘s faced criticism from both republicans and democrats about his approach to the allegations, and less than 24—hours before the meeting one of his top intelligence advisers quit his team. dan johnson reports. the three wise men of us intelligence. together in their belief that russian hacking interfered with the presidential election, intending to help donald trump win. hacking was only one part of it. and it also entailed classical propaganda, disinformation. but in the last few hours
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the president—elect has again questioned thatjudgement. how is the fbi so sure there was hacking, he asked in a tweet, when they didn‘t even examine the democratic campaign computers allegedly targeted ? it‘s the latest in a long list of online outbursts. first rubbishing intelligence officials before saying he‘s a big fan, then challenging it again. the cia said he was expecting a feisty meeting. i‘m hoping that he will be respectful and professional. respectful of the agency as well as the community, and i‘m looking forward to a rather robust, if not sporty, discussion on this issue. there has been more blunt criticism of mr trump‘s approach from his political enemies.
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grow up. time to be an adult, you‘re president. for a president not to have confidence in, not to be prepared to listen to the myriad of intelligence agencies, from defence intelligence, the cia etc is absolutely mindless. grow up. time to be an adult, you‘re president. you got to do something. show us what you have. not presidentjust yet, but donald trump‘s already announced at least two of these men will be replaced when he takes office two weeks today. danjohnson, dan johnson, bbc news. theresa may is due to hold her first meeting with donald trump, possibly as soon as next month. it‘s emerged that two of the prime minister‘s closest aides went to washington in december to hold discussions with mr trump‘s team. our political correspondent, eleanor garnier, joins us now from westminster. eleanor, how important will this meeting be for the prime minister?
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i think it will be a significant moment, as is any first meeting between the prime minister and new president of america. but theresa may‘s relationship with the white house is especially important as she tries to reshape britain‘s role in the world as she takes the uk out of the world as she takes the uk out of the eu. she‘s not going to be the first uk politician to meet mist trump, that was ukip‘s nigel farage. —— mist trump. last night he boasted he was going to be at mr trump‘s inauguration. it highlights the importance that she and number 10 place on establishing a strong relationship with mr trump. i think as you were pointing out, that meeting between her aides and mr trump‘s top team might have been a bit awkward. her two chiefs of staff
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had both previously publicly criticise mr trump, one said donald trump isa criticise mr trump, one said donald trump is a chump, one claimed american politics was depressing enough before trump took office. clearly a bit of building of bridges hasn‘t gone amiss. clearly a bit of building of bridges hasn't gone amiss. eleanor garnier, thank you. the failure to predict the financial crisis of 2008 was a michael fish moment for economists, the bank of england‘s chief economist has said. andy haldane compared financial forecasts to the famously inaccurate reassurances given by the bbc weatherman ahead of the uk‘s great storm of 1987. mr haldane said the profession was "to some degree in crisis" following the crash and the brexit vote. the train drivers‘ union aslef says it will go ahead with three days of strike action on the southern rail network next week. that‘s despite a report by the independent rail regulator claiming that trains with driver—operated doors, the source of the dispute, are safe. ben bland has more. a lack of funding to improve
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forensic science isjeopardising the integrity of the criminal justice system in england and wales, according to a watchdog. the forensic science regulator says it‘s also concerned about the processing of dna samples taken from suspects and victims of crime. the national police chiefs council says it has secured extra funding to respond to the challenges faced by the service. delays in discharging patients in the nhs in england have become significantly worse in mental health trusts than in acute hospitals, according to new research. there‘s been an increase of 60% in the number of beds occupied by patients who are well enough to leave but have nowhere to go, known as bed blocking. ministers say they will be spending £400 million over the next four years, to ensure mental health teams can provide support to people
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in their homes. michael buchanan has more. oliver lang helps his father run a small post office in norfolk. in 2014, the 27—year—old was detained under the mental health act. he spent several weeks in a psychiatric unit but even when he was well enough to leave he couldn‘t. delays in arranging suitable support in the community meant he spent a further two months unnecessarily in hospital. ijust felt like i was in danger in there because a lot happens in hospital and i felt like if someone attacked me i would have to defend myself, but if i did defend myself and hurt someone then they‘d say i was a danger to the public still and they would keep me locked up for longer, so i was trying to be whiter than white. the latest figures show more than 200,000 bed days were lost in the nhs in england as a whole in october 2016 due to delayed discharges. for nhs trusts specialising in physical healthcare, that represented a 30% rise on the previous 12 months. but for those trusts most closely focused on mental health and learning disabilities, the increase was 56%. the analysis was carried out for this former care minister who says the figures show that mental health patients are being discriminated against.
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it means there‘s a shortage of community psychiatric nurses, a shortage of support services like detox facilities and a shortage in social care, which i think has hit people with mental ill—health disproportionately hard. ministers say they‘re spending £400 million over the next four years to ensure mental health teams can provide more support to people in their homes. michael buchanan, bbc news. four people are due to appear in court in chicago later today charged with hate crimes over footage streamed live on facebook. the four suspects are accused of assaulting and racially taunting a white man with special needs. police believe the victim may have been kidnapped up to 48 hours before the attack. the funeral will take place today of the man who was shot dead by west yorkshire police on monday. 28—year—old yassar yaqub died after officers stopped a car he was in on a motorway slip road near huddersfield. a man arrested as part of the police operation will appear in court later charged with firearms offences.
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the actor om puri, who starred in the british comedy east is east, has died in india. he was 66 and is reported to have had a heart attack. om puri was awarded an honorary obe for his contribution to the british film industry in 2004. william lindesay has been obsessed with the great wall of china since seeing it in a school atlas as a child in england. and last year he embarked on an epicjourney, leaving his home on merseyside, to fulfil a lifelong ambition to film the wall in its entirety from the air, using a drone. his travels have taken him all over north china and even to mongolia. a baby elephant in thailand has been forced to overcome her fear of water by learning to walk again using hydrotherapy.
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meet five—month—old fah jam, who lost part of her foot in a trap laid by villagers. she‘ll need up to three months of treatment to help strengthen the muscles in her leg, but her vet says she‘s already showing signs of improvement. despite most elephants loving the water, fahjam was a little nervous going into the water. sort of holding her in a harness while she gets confidence in the water. how cute. those are the main stories this morning. all the sport and weather coming up for you shortly. it‘s a time of year when darker days and financial pressures can cause anxiety and depression for some people, and it‘s over the winter months that health professionals say they see an increase in mental health referrals. one type of support that‘s on offer is internet—based therapy that involves chatting to someone and getting advice online. breakfast‘s graham satchell has been to meet one man who‘s benefited from this way of treating depression. i struggle.
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i have struggled. not a time of year that i enjoy at all. when i‘m expected to be happy, i‘m supposed to be, i struggle even more. christmas and new year are difficult times for nick. he‘s lived with anxiety and depression for many years. i worry about everything. i worried about this interview. have been since i found out it was happening. my natural instinct is to worry about everything. i‘m constantly thinking and analysing everything that‘s going on around me. i struggle to make decisions, some of them really simple decisions. what i‘m going to have supper, for example. i can spend an awful long time in the supermarketjust trying to get through that kind of thing. nick went to his gp for help. she offered him a series of online therapy sessions. it‘s a typed conversation with a trained therapist that you never meet.
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it‘s quite strange getting started. you write something, how you‘re feeling, what you‘re thinking, and there‘s a pause while the other person, your therapist, is waiting to respond. and just writing something down, which i‘d never done before and i was scared to do it, i found it was a safe way to do that. it had quite a profound effect actually for me personally. as well as the convenience of this kind of therapy, advocates say doing it helps some people to open up. i found it really liberating in a way that i was not expecting. i shared some pretty challenging things, from my perspective, anyway. it's surprisingly how much more information the patient has been able to share using this system. online therapy on the nhs is normally delivered by private companies, like ieso digital health. critics say it‘s just a cheap way of providing a service that should be face—to—face.
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but the therapists who do it say the success rate is the same, and the process surprising. when you put a computer between an experienced therapist and patient, all sorts of things can happen. usually, in my experience, those problem statements, the first thing they say to their therapists, take a little bit of getting at. but here we see it occurring right there in the first session. and that‘s really important, because once you know what the problem is, you can start the treatment. talking to a therapist online won‘t work for everyone, but it has helped nick. i guess it gave me a way to cope. i was really struggling to cope with what i was thinking, and it gave me a real way to cope. that was nick martin speaking to breakfast‘s graham satchell. jenny edwards is the chief executive of the mental health foundation and joins us now.
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one of the things i was surprised by that came out of that in a digital session, what they were saving was it got to the crux of the problem sometimes much quicker. have you seen that as well? yes, it is, and the benefit if it helps people have choice. for some people this will be much easier. what we find is men are more likely to come forward for something online than they are face to face. we know that men are weighed less likely to complete a normal course of therapy than women. they find this much easier. so you need to offer people choice because we are all different. this will be the natural way to get help. what is the natural way to get help. what is the difference between getting an internet appointment like this as opposed to seeing someone, is it a difference in terms of how soon it will happen? in some areas, waiting
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times for face—to—face support can be extremely long, and so to step in early and prevent problems become serious, opportunities like online, oi' serious, opportunities like online, or guided self—help, serious, opportunities like online, or guided self— help, which serious, opportunities like online, or guided self—help, which needs no therapist, can be helpful for mild to moderate forms of ill—health.” am sure there are lots of ways to do this, because you talk to people online, for example, on a helpdesk, and it is obvious they are talking to lots of people. if you are having this session, is itjust the therapist communicating with one person? yes, in this type of online support it would very much be focused on view. they need to be very closely listening to what you say. what about confidentiality, because we talk all the time about privacy and information, you know, you are typing it into a computer, how can you be sure it is going to stay there? it is important to take
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the steps to make sure what is on offer to people is properly tested and regulated and recommended through health bodies. there is a huge hunger for people to look after their health online. about a fifth of apps available are about health and a certain proportion on mental health. it is the wild west. we need the government to step up to those who have picked it up in a big way, like in australia and europe, the netherlands, we are working on a project with other european countries doing much better. what standards should be set, what are the types of online support that ought to be available? alongside all of that advice, you have to be sure the person is legitimate. absolutely. you can'tjust put it into an internet search asking for someone to chat to for help with mental issues. no, there are things
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that can happen through peer support. through properly set up websites, there are some that are very well known, like big white wall, that we know are properly set up. the peer support workers have been trained. you know that, but how can someone seeking help know who is legitimate? at the moment, there are a few recommended sites on the nhs online, but we really need to step up online, but we really need to step up in online, but we really need to step upina online, but we really need to step up in a big way. if you look at other countries, they have a range of things that people can have faith in and that they know are properly trained and monitored. just don't trust anybody out there. yes, and for people feeling, you know, it is a particular time of year that people feel low as well, so what is the first stop? the first stop for anyone going through at half—time is to talk to someone they trust, often
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family members and close friends who came provide support. there is a lot of online guidance for people who might support a family or friend. that is how most of us get through top —— a things. go to your gp if it is beyond that and they can recommend you to online counselling oi' recommend you to online counselling or the more conventional forms of support. and as i say, in some areas of the country, even in the news today, we know the waiting lists are enormous and, of course, then it doesn't help people with intense problems because they are in a queue with everybody else. thank you very much. it was really cold yesterday and again today. yes, it is cold for some. not as many as yesterday. if we look at the temperatures from yesterday, widely below freezing, —8
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in oxfordshire. around oxfordshire and east anglia there is frost. elsewhere, temperatures are above freezing, especially northern ireland, 15 degrees higher than 24 hours ago. there is a price to pay, we swa p hours ago. there is a price to pay, we swap frost with rain. especially in northern ireland. we have atla ntic in northern ireland. we have atlantic air pushing in. it is less chilly. with it some weather fronts producing rain for northern ireland. it will ease off in the west. it is particularly wet to the south—west scotland. further north it is dry. some drizzle to the west. to the east it will be dry and bright to start. it will be dry all day. frost in the east of the pennines. temperatures left quickly as the cloud spills in. rain and resort in northumberland. the breeze is picking up here and clouding over for devon and cornwall. the south—east and east anglia, this is
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where we have frost. some patches of freezing fog. the aware if you are about to hit the roads. the fault will lift as the breeze picks up and most will stay dry with sunny spells. not the blue skies of yesterday. elsewhere, multiplied around, parts of the west of the pennines and the north and west of wales have cloud around. a big contrast to the afternoon, for degrees in norwich, 11 in belfast. it will be cool in the south—east but as reigning spills in in the evening temperatures left even more. —— as though rain spills in. temperatures in double figures to start tomorrow morning. clear skies across northern scotland leading to widespread frost in the highlands to ta ke widespread frost in the highlands to take us into the start of the weekend. a frosty start but at least there is sunshine around. not much sunshine elsewhere. it is a grey start to the weekend. the odd patch of rain or drizzle in southern counties around the english channel.
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many will be dry. it will be brightest in north—east scotland with five or six degrees, 11 or 12 in the south. on sunday, sunny conditions for eastern scotland and north—east england. cloud elsewhere, brightness here and there but sports or drizzle. temperatures at best around 10 or11, or drizzle. temperatures at best around 10 or 11, much more mild than at the moment and much more mild and south—east europe, where some will have highs of around — 12. south—east europe, where some will have highs of around -12. -12? my goodness. thank you. let's take you through some of the front pages. lots of interest in this, economics in crisis. the chief economist of the bank of england says they failed to foresee the 2008 financial crash and subsequently misjudging the impact of the brexit vote. the front of the mail talking about whitehall and they say that whitehall
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diplomats face unsustainable pressure facing the vote to leave the eu and they are asking for more money. lots of the papers talking aboutjill saward, 51, campaigner for fellow victims of sexual assault, referred to as the ealing vicarage rape victim, who died yesterday. they are talking about what a disgrace that she didn‘t receive an honour. she really changed things. absolutely. the daily telegraph, the image that you can see, we are about to get a new first lady in a week‘s time, this is an image of natalie portman in the film jackie about jackie kennedy. and the story about brexit dominating the front of the telegraph. jill saward making the front of the times. her bravery helped change the law and talking about wrecks it as well. shall we
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look at the inside papers? well, yes, captured people's imaginations, can you go to the supermarket in your dressing gown and pjs? it has caused a row in tesco after ladies when shopping in their dressing down. i mentioned i wouldn't go to a supermarket but one morning in winter i got a onesie for christmas, i put it on because i was cold, i made a cup of tea, i ran out of milk, the shop was 50 yards away, it was dark... stop justifying milk, the shop was 50 yards away, it was dark... stopjustifying it, let‘s have a look. was dark... stopjustifying it, let's have a look. this is a video argued for a friend's wedding, it is the same onesie that are used to go to the shop. no one saw me, it was dark, 50 yards, i got a pint of milk, the lady didn't even link, she thought, oh, it isjust mike, and no one knew anything about it until today. no one minds what you wear,
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although i wouldn't go to a big supermarket. if anyone had seen you that morning, it was dark, you were ina that morning, it was dark, you were in a false suit, anyone driving would have had a fright. those foxes are getting big. urban foxes, exactly. they are very clever these days. tesco says store managers have permission to eject customers if they are wearing pyjamas, so, you know, mike... so long as you were something, it is ok. ithink know, mike... so long as you were something, it is ok. i think that is the point. where is the harm? people can get offended by it, but i can't, even though i wouldn't go anywhere else. are you coming back to do the sport? i hope so, if! am allowed, not wearing a onesie, of course. we are looking at some fantastic things now. from small boat—builders to glamorous super yachts, business is booming for the uk‘s leisure boating industry. figures out today show that its grown for the fifth year
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in a row. coletta‘s finding her sea legs at the london boat show for us. look at those. these are the super yachts? they are indeed and we are looking at the very high end of the industry, correct. good morning. welcome back to the london boat show. the boating industry, leisure boats in the uk, it is an industry worth £3 billion and it has grown in recent yea rs. worth £3 billion and it has grown in recent years. we are third in the world when it comes to the number of companies. this one here, sunseeker, employ 2000 people, so it is a significant industry. this superyacht would set you back £6 million, apparently, so if you have money to throw around, spend your summer holidays on this. most of them are small boat builders, 80%, in fact, and we are now finding
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pheobe at the whole of another boat. it is an expensive industry, but more people are spending on boats, not buying them, but taking holidays on them. you can buy a timeshare in a small boat for a couple of thousand pounds, which gets you a couple of weeks per year. you can re nt couple of weeks per year. you can rent something in france or the uk for a about £600 per week. it isn't bad for a self catering family holiday. £6 million is steep for many and! holiday. £6 million is steep for many and i think you could fit a few houses in this superyacht. this is the biggest on show. people are looking for water— based holidays and experiences they can remember. thank you. yes, you would have to save up for a while to be able to afford this. it looks amazing to be on. i am not going to own it. i would never want to own one of
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those. i wanted to go down and have a look what it is like, see what the galley is like. is that what it is called? it looks lovely, but... we will be back there later. time now for the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i‘m alice salfield. london‘s status as a global hub cannot be taken for granted post brexit, according to a new report by london first. it says the government must take steps to reduce uncertainty for the capital by investing in housing, skills training and transport. it also recommends changing the visa system to ensure the capital can retain skilled migrants. one of the country‘s best known nightclubs, fabric, is to re—open tonight, after reaching a new licensing deal about drugs and security. it was made to close in september after two 18—year—olds died
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after taking ecstasy there. islington council said at the time the club had a "culture of drug use" which staff were "incapable of controlling". fabric bosses say from now on, under 19s won‘t be allowed in, and anyone found with drugs will be banned for life. a long—neglected edwardian lido in berkshire is to re—open following an extensive refurbishment. the kings meadow baths in reading closed in the 1970s and fell into disrepair. the grade two building has now been renamed thames lido, and is expected to re—open this summer with a spa and restaurant alongside a chlorine—free pool. it is totally preserved as it was, but now it is protected by all of this surrounding glass. so behind the glass wall is the old set out, the old layout. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. starting with the tubes, a signal failure at farringdon is causing a few problems. severe delays on the circle line clockwise, the hammersmith & city line eastbound and the metropolitan line is part suspended between baker street and aldgate. there‘s also a part closure on tfl rail between brentwood and shenfield. on the roads, the a1 remains closed at upper holloway. it‘s closed until the 16th
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for bridge works. and in deptford, haddo street is closed after a large fire on a boat last night. now here‘s elizabeth rizzini with the weather. hello. good morning. it‘s another frosty start to the day. you may have found yourself scraping the car windscreen again today. this picture was taken yesterday. today, there won‘t be quite as much sunshine around. in fact, it will cloud over as the day wears on. we are also looking at patches of freezing fog through the course of the morning possibly causing hazards through the morning rush hour. most likely to stick around for much of the morning towards south—eastern areas of the capital. we will see cloud push in from the north—west through the course of the day. gradually turning cloudier and feeling a touch milder than yesterday. highs between 5—7 degrees. we should stay dry until the evening. then we will see rain push down from the north—west. most of it tends to be light and patchy, turning to drizzle by the time we get to tomorrow morning. mild tonight with overnight lows of around four or five. over the weekend, it will stay mostly dry. there could still be outbreaks
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of drizzle perhaps on saturday, and certainly a lot of cloud as well. generally, looking milder. nine or 10 celsius. in reality, it will not feel that pleasant because of the low grey cloud. at least the winds are light. it will turn briefly into the start of next week with rain at times. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it‘s back to charlie and louise. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with louise minchin and charlie stayt. the us president—elect, donald trump, is due to meet intelligence chiefs today, to discuss claims that russia tried to interfere in the american presidential election. he‘s faced criticism from both republicans and democrats about his approach to the allegations, and less than 24 hours before the meeting, one of his top intelligence advisers quit his team. theresa may is due to hold her first meeting with donald trump,
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possibly as soon as next month. it‘s emerged that two of the prime minister‘s closest aides went to washington in december to hold discussions with the president—elect‘s team the failure to predict the financial crisis of 2008 was a ‘michael fish‘ moment for economists, the bank of england‘s chief economist has said. andy haldane compared financial forecasts to the famously inaccurate reassurances given by the bbc weatherman ahead of the uk‘s great storm of 1987. mr haldane said the profession was "to some degree in crisis", following the crash and the brexit vote. the train drivers‘ union aslef says it will go ahead with three days of strike action on the southern rail network next week. that‘s despite a report by the independent rail regulator claiming that trains
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with driver—operated doors, the source of the dispute, are safe. the transport secretary, chris grayling, says the strikes are politically motivated. we will talk to him shortly. delays in discharging patients in the nhs in england have become significantly worse in mental health trusts than in acute hospitals, according to new research. there‘s been an increase of 60% in the number of beds occupied by patients who are well enough to leave but have nowhere to go, known as bed blocking. ministers say they will be spending £400 million over the next four years to ensure mental health teams can provide support to people in their homes. four people are due to appear in court in chicago later today charged with hate crimes over footage streamed live on facebook. the four suspects are accused of assaulting and racially taunting a white man with special needs. police believe the victim may have been kidnapped up to 48 hours before the attack. the actor om puri, who starred in the british comedy east is east,
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has died in india. he was 66 and is reported to have had a heart attack. om puri was awarded an honorary obe for his contribution to the british film industry in 2004. it‘s said to be one of the only landmarks that can be seen from space. now one man has found a new way to view the great wall of china from the air. william lindesay has been dreaming of visiting it since he saw it in a school atlas when he was a child. now he‘s travelled from merseyside to china to capture these stunning pictures using a drone. that brings you up to date. matt will have the weather in around ten minutes. right now, mike is here with all the sport. it's one of my favourite weekends of the sporting calendar, the third round of the fa cup where you get the minnows, stourbridge, barrow sharing the headlines with manchester city and west ham, kicking it all off tonight. pep
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guardiola has won everything, he‘s one of the most famous managers in the world, but he‘s never had a taste of the fa cup but it gets under way tonight. the first match of the weekend is an all premier league tie at the london stadium where west ham host manchester city. guardiola has achieved many things in the game already but he‘s never been involved in an fa cup tie. what i hear before, the cup is special because the lower teams can beat the big teams. that‘s why it is so fascinating. it happens in the cup as well. that‘s why i‘m looking forward. but of course it‘ a premier league hame, it is tough, it will be luck of the draw. a big game for us and a big game forthem, the fa cup. it is for the fans of course and i am sure they will put a very strong team tomorrow,
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because it's a big chance for them to get a trophy. that matches live on bbc one this evening. hull city have appointed the former sporting lisbon and olympiakos coach marco silva as their new manager as they attempt to avoid relegation from the premier league. the 39—year—old portuguese, who‘s nicknamed the ‘mini mourinho‘, has signed a contract until the end of the season. he led olympiakos to the greek title last season. hull are currently bottom of the table. leicester midfielder riyad mahrez has won the 2016 african player of the year award. the algerian helped his club side to the premier league title last season, scoring 17 goals. johanna konta has been beaten this morning in the semi—finals of the shenzen open in china.
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she lost in three sets to katerina siniakova. but sir andy murray marches on, he‘s through to the qatar open semi—finals after beating spain‘s nicolas almagro in straight sets yesterday. but the briton didn‘t have things all his own way in doha. the first set went to a tie—break which murray won 7—6. it was almost as tight in the second, but at 5—5, the world number one broke his opponent and served out the victory. he‘ll face tomas berdych next. castleford tigers will claim they should receive half a million in compensation after winger denny solomona left the club and swopped codes, joining rugby union side sale. the bbc has seen court papers, which claim sale had been interested in the player moving since last summer and that they knew he was under contract with castleford until november, 2018. sale deny that they, the player or his agent have done anything wrong. it‘s understood the legal claim was issued in court last month. we remember him paddling his way down the rapids to medals
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in the summer, but now the british olympic canoeing star richard hounslow has retired from the sport. he‘s 35, and won two silver medals in the canoe double, with partner david florence at london 2012 and rio 2016. hounslow, seen here on the right, said it had been a ‘true honour‘ to represent his country at the highest level. he said he loved doing it but he didn‘t like going under and doing the eskimo roll to get out. it is like rovers. the early mornings. there‘s only so much pain you can ta ke there‘s only so much pain you can take —— rowers. he has done it at two olympic games. how he can watch his beloved spurs. you can think of a lineup going tojoin thejump but he isn‘t one of them, unlike kadina
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cox. he‘s been dubbed britain‘s grumpiest shopkeeper after charging customers 50p to browse his secondhand book store. but with small retailers facing huge competition from high street giants and internet shopping, you might think that steve bloom is making a brave stand. fiona trott has been to meet him. a charming market town nestled in the yorkshire dales. halls isn‘t supposed to court controversy but beyond these door is a bookshop and browsers are in for a surprise. have you bought anything in before? we came here about five years ago.” tell you how it works, 50p to come in and then between you or each and if you buy something you get it back. not everyone likes it and certain words have been exchanged which you won‘t find in any of these books. it's my shop, it's my little world, this is my little world. i
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run it. i‘m comfortable with feeling people that come in appreciate it andi people that come in appreciate it and i do feel it‘s my right. people who say to me you shouldn‘t be doing this, well, you get charged all the time for all sorts of things. if there‘s a book fair, a craft fair, a car park, toilets, it‘s not so ridiculous as people say it is. but the parish council says it is embarrassed and it‘s received over 20 complaints. when people are an aware of the cha cha cha alleged by him to pay it he then sets of being rude and offensive. —— unaware of the charge asked by him. the damage to us ina the charge asked by him. the damage to us in a wider world is quite considerable. it is run by trustees and they say his management style doesn‘t constitute a public nuisance. in the meantime steve has agreed to put up a sign to tell
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customers what to expect. did you see the book? it was called ta ct did you see the book? it was called tact and skill in handling people. it's tact and skill in handling people. it‘s interesting the reactions, when he explains what he‘s doing, he says it is my shop, if i want to do that then i will, quite a few people getting in touch, the difference is maybe he‘s not that worried about making that much money. if your goal is to make money then that is counter—productive because people might be deterred from getting in. people have been getting in touch, some people say why not if he wants to. janet says as a prolific reader, you don't make much profit out of secondhand books, you want your customers to be serious readers and notjust coming out customers to be serious readers and not just coming out of the cold. mandy vere understands the difficulties of being an independent retailer, she works for a small book shop in liverpool and joins us now, along with retail analyst
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catherine shuttleworth. good morning to you both. mandy, what do you make of it? the thing about independent bookshops is we are all different, that‘s what makes us are all different, that‘s what makes us independent and that is what people love, we have different stock, we have different ethics, different ambience and this guy is one of the great british eccentric booksellers, of which there is a great tradition. —— different ambiences. people love the literature we have in the shop because it is chosen very specially. in your shop the notion of charging to come in, is it a complete no—no? we don‘t do that. we are about trying to attract people in by having something different about us. we are totally different from an online bookseller because we‘ve chosen our stock and people will
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find things they never knew existed. we‘ve got a little kettle in the corner where you can make a cup of tea for 50p. we have a toy box in the kids area. people love us when they find us. catherine, i'm interested if there‘s a change here, we hear stories of people going into perhaps not bookshops but maybe it happens in bookshops, trying on clothes thinking that‘s lovely and they get it cheaper elsewhere, does that happen elsewhere? it's the idea of showroom in. we look somewhere and then we go and buy online. —— show rooming. when they are in the shop they go to the smart phone and buy it at home. they try it on and then they read the book and they go home and buy it. there‘s a strong feeling from a lot of retailers that they need to fight back and maybe this is what the gentleman is doing but it‘s a tough time for an independent retailer. business rates
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are about to increase, every single penny counts and there is a frustration when people use you as a showroom and they don‘t spend any money with you so i have a lot of sympathy with him. shopping when you analyse it is confusing because a shop like that, which is secondhand books, you‘re not necessarily going in to buy something. you might or you might not. that has to be the principal, doesn‘t it? you might not. that has to be the principal, doesn't it? most people don‘t go out into account in the morning expecting to buy a book u nless morning expecting to buy a book unless it is christmas or a special time. i think what happens is people get drawn in because of your window display and because they‘ve heard something about the bookshop and they are interested and they want to browse and if you‘ve got good stock and interesting books, we‘ve got books that are fantastic, books about change in the world and those that give an alternative view on the world and we have students coming in
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for their textbooks and then they find something different they never knew existed and quirky in the corner. we‘ve got t—shirts and mugs and we‘ve expanded our range. corner. we‘ve got t—shirts and mugs and we've expanded our range. the notion of the grumpy shopkeeper... you described it as eccentric, catherine, people can go for that reason alone? absolutely. there will be people queueing up today to see him, all publicity is good publicity and it's really important we have these interesting retailers and places you can go to and why not? we should have that and encourage that in the uk. were a nation of shopkeepers after all so why shouldn't we do that? -- we're a nation. one thought from janet, he is alienating so many customers and i wouldn‘t pay 50p for a book browse. alicia, encouraging people into a shop and not even putting them off before they have step in them off before they have step in the door. good morning. cold and frosty. yes,
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only for some. a day of contrast. for some the familiar frosty start. for some the familiar frosty start. for others we swap the frost for some rain. much more mild across other parts of the country. we split the uk into two. at the moment, in the uk into two. at the moment, in the south—east, —6. 15 degrees warmer in northern ireland. 15 degrees warmer in county down than it was yesterday. it is less cold mild air pushing in that will be with us through the weekend. cold airwill be in with us through the weekend. cold air will be in eastern europe, some only get two —12 in the afternoon. that is cold. it is still chilly out there. to go with the frost there will be sunshine and patches of freezing fog. be wary of that if you are heading onto the roads. clouding overfor are heading onto the roads. clouding over for the rest of england and wales. it is breezy across anglesey.
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outbreaks of rain. patti ad—free for the rest of northern england. eastern areas has frost, temperatures already starting to rise. south—west of scotland, we have had rain from northern ireland, that will ease off over the next couple of hours. the rest of the day will be grey and gloomy. the rain is more hit and miss. a wet day in the south of scotland, wet in northern england, wales and the midlands. north of scotland might be dry with sunshine. sunshine as well to the south—east will continue. not as quite blue skies as yesterday. five degrees in norwich, 11 in belfast. temperate contrast continues. through the evening into tonight the rain this evening for east anglia and the south—east eventually introduces mild air to leave a damp night, misty in the west. for most frost free with the exemption in the north. we could see frost here and
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the brightest conditions for the weekend. a lot of dry weather a round over the weekend, although it will be damp for southern areas. the odd spot of light rain or drizzle from excessive amounts of cloud through saturday. it will be misty over the hills in the west. parts of scotla nd over the hills in the west. parts of scotland has sunshine. cool conditions at five or six degrees can head to 10 or 11 further south. we do it all again into sunday with more sunshine for eastern england. certainly to the east of scotland. lots of cloud elsewhere. the odd spot of rain or drizzle. temperatures above where they should be for the time of year. a big change on yesterday but the downside is we have lost the blue skies and we have the cloud. thank you very much. see you later. we are going to go on boards on boats now, some yachts, some of them ari spencer, some of them are not expensive. the uk‘s leisure boating industry has grown for the fifth year in a row, according to figures out
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today. we‘ve sent coletta to make herself comfortable on the super—yachts at the london boat show. it looks like a lovely one, this one. morning. it is lovely indeed, yes. welcome back. this is the london boat show looking at the uk leisure boat industry and it is also about a small boats, 80% of the industry is small boat and sharon is pa rt industry is small boat and sharon is part of the group. it has been a difficult couple of years and things are looking good? yes, a tough couple of years but we have gone into the new year feeling positive, with a couple of orders on order, which is really good. my husband is in chicago next week with a coaster for the very first time and it is the big year. we are 50 years old, so it isa the big year. we are 50 years old, so it is a big celebration. and how many people fit in those boats that you are making? from four people opted —— up to 12 people, and lots
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of people can use them, we cater for everyone. is the weak pound helping sell boats are brought? it has helped us, yes, and we don'tjust build boats, we do all of the accessories. that has helped us with americans, they have ordered a lot of spares and accessories, which has beena of spares and accessories, which has been a bonus. thank you for chatting to us. i am going to let you have a look inside this one. this is the biggest in the whole show. this is what £6 million will buy you. it is excessively swanky. you said we would maybe have to save up for a while for this one. you probably would. if we can come through the sitting area we will find the master bedroom at the back. and in here, the man in charge of the company, sunseekers, is phil, and we are not
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sailing anywhere? it is a fantastic master suite. down to the dressing area and the bathroom underneath, which is unique. give have to be a millionaire or a billionaire to afford this, but more people are able to afford it? the world is becoming more affluent with ultrahigh net worth individuals interested in boats around the world, and we are growing in all markets, selling in 45 markets. is it overseas that you are targeting at the moment? 95% - it overseas that you are targeting at the moment? 9596 - 9896 of boats go abroad, market growth in the us at the moment, we have seen growth throughout last year, 20% up in terms of revenue. i am glad to say those orders are coming from all over the world. would you like a little look at the downstairs floor, because another is above us, and now we can go down if you are interested
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in the lower floor. a couple of steps to navigate. if i had downstairs, there is some plush carpet which i didn‘t want to mark with my grubby shoes. this is one of the bedrooms. it has been an early start. something about being on a boat. i might just start. something about being on a boat. i mightjust enjoy it is a smorgasbord of delight and relax for a while. will you ask antell how much it cost to fill it up —— and tell. fill it up? iwill ask it. thank you very much. that is quite special, isn‘t it? thank you very much. that is quite special, isn't it? it isn't entirely to my taste, but there you go. we can haggle over it. we‘ll have more
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a little bit later with some surfboards as well. absolutely. its stones are world famous — and no—one knows exactly why its there, but now there‘s a theory that the sound of stonehenge could unlock some its hidden history. it is fascinating. one archaeologist has taken up the challenge of recreating what the acoustics of the ruins would have been like 3000 years ago — and he says it could reveal why the site was so important. our arts correspondent david sillito reports. wind blows eerily people have been coming here for at least 4000—5000 years, so we‘re walking in the feet of history. when the wind blows, some people say they hear a strange hum. thomas hardy wrote about it in tess of the d‘urbervilles, and doctor rupert till is convinced the sound of stonehenge is part of its magic. taps you hear between each
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beat a little echo. the problem is this isjust a fragment of the sound people would have heard 4000 years ago. i met the site‘s historian, susan greening. so, this is the front door of stonehenge we‘re going through right now? that‘s right, yes, and we are coming into the central space now. it does change a little bit, doesn‘t it? it does, you have the feeling of being enclosed within a space. and that‘s with many of the stones having gone. what we‘re looking at today is the ruin of stonehenge. many stones have been taken away from the site, many have fallen down, lots have been eroded, they‘re covered in lichen. it would‘ve been a completely different atmosphere, wouldn‘t it? yes, it would.
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however, rupert tell has an answer. what this new technology offers is a possibility, a chance to, well, return back and see and also hear what this place used to look like in the past. we have constructed it by rebuilding stonehenge digitally and rebuilding the acoustics of the space as it would have been when all of the stones were here. so, how different is the old sound to the sound we have today? well, if i tap it strong now, you will hear a little bit of an echo. when all of the stones are put in place, there is a much more powerful sense of enclosure, a slight reverberation, more echo, and it changes more as you walk around. and the reason he is convinced ancient people were interested in sound is because of his work on caves.
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hundreds of metres underground they found ancient instruments and human marks on certain stalactites. stalactites that are musical. 19,20,21,22,23,24,25. plays notes on stalactites so today it‘s just ruin beside a city road, a chance to say goodbye to the 21st century and experience the last sound of stonehenge. i always thought they were beautiful, maybe even more so now. eery, that‘s what it is. also coming up on breakfast this morning. it‘s dark, it‘s gritty, and it stars tom hardy. iama
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i am a very dangerous man. he is. we‘ll find out what makes him so dangerous and what else to expect in taboo, from the man behind the new bbc drama. and dramatic it is. we have bone seen it, haven‘t we? and dramatic it is. we have bone seen it, haven't we? absolutely. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i‘m alice salfield. london‘s status as a global hub cannot be taken for granted post brexit, according to a new report by london first. it says the government must take steps to reduce uncertainty for the capital by investing in housing, skills training and transport. it also recommends changing the visa system to ensure the capital can retain skilled migrants. the organisation said leaving the eu also presented new opportunities —— one of the country‘s best known nightclubs, fabric, is to re—open tonight,
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after reaching a new licensing deal about drugs and security. it was made to close in september after two 18—year—olds died after taking ecstasy there. islington council said at the time the club had a "culture of drug use" which staff were "incapable of controlling". fabric bosses say from now on, under 19s won‘t be allowed in, and anyone found with drugs will be banned for life. a long—neglected edwardian lido in berkshire is to re—open following an extensive refurbishment. the kings meadow baths in reading closed in the 1970s and fell into disrepair. the grade two building has now been renamed thames lido, and is expected to re—open this summer with a spa and restaurant alongside a chlorine—free pool. it is totally preserved as it was, but now it is protected by all of this surrounding glass. so behind the glass wall is the old set out, the old layout. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. starting with the tubes, a signal failure at farringdon is causing a few problems.
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severe delays on the circle line clockwise, the hammersmith & city line eastbound and the metropolitan line. there‘s also a part closure on tfl rail between brentwood and shenfield. on the roads, the a1 remains closed at upper holloway. it‘s closed until the 16th for bridge works. and the usual traffic on the a13 into town is not being helped by a crash at movers lane. now here‘s elizabeth rizzini with the weather. hello. good morning. it‘s another frosty start to the day. you may have found yourself scraping the car windscreen again today. this picture was taken yesterday. today, there won‘t be quite as much sunshine around. in fact, it will cloud over as the day wears on. we are also looking at patches of freezing fog through the course of the morning possibly causing hazards through the morning rush hour. most likely to stick around for much of the morning towards south—eastern areas of the capital. we will see cloud push in from the north—west through the course of the day. gradually turning cloudier and feeling a touch milder than yesterday. highs between 5—7 degrees. we should stay dry until the evening. then we will see rain push down from the north—west. most of it tends to be light and patchy, turning to drizzle by the time we get
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to tomorrow morning. mild tonight with overnight lows of around four or five. over the weekend, it will stay mostly dry. there could still be outbreaks of drizzle perhaps on saturday, and certainly a lot of cloud as well. generally, looking milder. nine or 10 celsius. in reality, it will not feel that pleasant because of the low grey cloud. at least the winds are light. it will turn briefly into the start of next week with rain at times. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and charlie stayt. donald trump goes face to face with intelligence chiefs after weeks of speculation over hacking. they‘ll tell the president—elect why they think russia intervened in the us election campaign as donald trump faces criticism from both sides of the political divide. grow up. time to be an adult. you‘re president.
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good morning, it‘s friday the 6th january. also this morning. taking too long to discharge patients. psychiatric units experience worse delays than acute hospitals in england. a call for children to be taught about terror in schools, as one former navy boss says pupils should know the facts about what happened. good morning, i‘m at the london boat show which is all about the uk leisure boat industry. from the small but perfectly formed to the absolutely join or must small but perfectly formed to the absolutelyjoin or must end of things. an industry worth £3 billion. in sport, it‘s one of the highlights of the sporting calendar, as the top teams enter the fa cup, and one of the world‘s most successful managers,
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pep guardiola gets his first taste of its magic tonight. music the real mr and mrs of the strictly dance floor are taking their moves on tour, we‘ll speak to kevin and karen clifton. and matt has the weather. cold for some. it certainly is. the ice scraper is out again across southern and eastern parts of the uk. it's southern and eastern parts of the uk. it‘s not the same everywhere. some of you can leave the ice scraper alone but please grab the waterproofs! that‘s all coming up in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. the us president—elect, donald trump, is due to meet intelligence chiefs today, to discuss claims that russia tried to interfere in the american presidential election. he‘s faced criticism from both republicans and democrats about his approach to the allegations, and less than 24 hours before the meeting, one of his top intelligence advisers quit his team.
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dan johnson reports. the three wise men of us intelligence. together in their belief that russian hacking interfered with the presidential election, intending to help donald trump win. hacking was only one part of it. and it also entailed classical propaganda, disinformation, fake news. but in the last few hours the president—elect has again questioned thatjudgment. how is the fbi so sure there was hacking, he asked in a tweet, when they didn‘t even examine the democratic campaign computers allegedly targeted ? it‘s the latest in a long list of online outbursts. first rubbishing intelligence officials, before saying he‘s a big fan, then challenging them again. the cia director said he was expecting a feisty meeting.
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i am hoping that he will be respectful and professional. respectful of the agency as well as the community, and i'm looking forward to a rather robust, if not sporty, discussion on this issue. there has been more blunt criticism of mr trump‘s approach from his political enemies. for a oresident not to have confidence in, not to be prepared to listen to the myriad of intelligence agencies, from defence intelligence, the cia etc, is absolutely mindless. grow up. time to be an adult, you're president. you got to do something. show us what you have. not presidentjust yet, but donald trump‘s already announced at least two of these men will be replaced when he takes office two weeks today. dan johnson, bbc news. theresa may is due to hold her first
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meeting with donald trump, possibly as soon as next month. it‘s emerged that two of the prime minister‘s closest aides went to washington in december to hold discussions with mr trump‘s team. our political correspondent, eleanor garnier, joins us now from westminster. they‘ve made the initialforay they‘ve made the initial foray and had pre—talk talks? they‘ve made the initial foray and had pre-talk talks? that's right. i think it will be a significant moment, as is any first meeting between a uk prime minister and a new us president. i think theresa may‘s relationship with the white house is especially important, as she tries to reshape the uk‘s role in the world that she takes britain out of the eu. she won‘t be the first uk politician to meet mr trump. that was nigel farage, who last night was boasting that he is going to be at mr trump‘s
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inauguration. i think the fact she secretly sent her two most senior and trusted aides highlights how important she places the relationship between the uk and the us. i think it could have been ozil bit ofan us. i think it could have been ozil bit of an awkward meeting, too. her chief of staff have previously publicly criticised mr trump. one said he was a chump, the other claimed american politics was" depressing enough" before trump took off. a building of bridges hasn‘t gone amiss. aslef has said it will go ahead with the strike next week. the transport secretary chris grayling says the strikes are "politically motivated".
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chris grayling will speak to us in a few minutes to tell us what it means for passengers and what he might do about it. a lack of funding to improve forensic science is jeopardising the integrity of the criminal justice system jeopardising the integrity of the criminaljustice system in england and wales, according to a watchdog. the forensic science regulator says it is concerned about the processing of dna samples taken from suspects and victims of crime. delays in discharging patients in the nhs in england have become significantly worse in mental health trusts than in acute hospitals according to new research. there‘s been an increase of 60% in the number of beds occupied by patients who are well enough to leave but have. ministers say they will be spending £400 million over the next four years to ensure mental health teams can
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support people in their homes. oliver lang helped his father run a small post office in norfolk. he was detained under the mental health act and spent several weeks in a psychiatric unit. even when he was well enough to leave, he couldn‘t. delays in arranging suitable support in the community meant he spent two months unnecessarily in—hospital.” felt like i was in danger because a lot happens in hospital. ifelt like if someone attacked me i would have to defend myself but if i did defend myself, they would say he is a danger to the public so they would keep me locked up for longer. the latest figures show more than 200,000 bed days were lost in england as a whole due to delayed discharges. the nhs trusts specialising in physical health care that represented a 30% rise on the previous 12 months. for those trusts most closely focused on mental health and learning disabilities, the increase was 56%. the analysis
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was carried out by this former care minister who says this shows mental health patients are being discriminated against. there is a shortage of community psychiatric nurses and support service like detox facilities, and a shortage in social care which has hit people with mental ill—health disproportionately hard. ministers say they are spending £400 million over the next four years to ensure mental health teams can provide more support to people in their homes. the pressure of patient numbers last month prompted a third of hospital trusts in england to issue warnings that they needed to take urgent action to cope, according to analysis seen by radio 4. in the most serious cases, the trusts declared they were unable to give patients comprehensive care. the data comes from the nuffield trust. four people appeared due to appear in court in chicago today charged with hate crimes over footage
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streamed on facebook. the four suspects are accused of assaulting and racially taunting a white man with special needs. police believe the victim may have been kidnapped 48 hours before the attack. stalkers will face longerjail terms as part of the drive to toughen punishments. the maximum sentence will rise to ten years. the ministry ofjustice says the plans will help ensure it minimises the impact on victims. the actor om puri has died at the age of 66 and is reported to have had a heart attack. he was awarded an honorary obe for his contribution to the british film industry in 2004. it is said to be one of the new landmarks that can be seen from space. now one man has found a new way to view the great wall of china from the air. liam lindsay has been dreaming of visiting it after seeing it in dreaming of visiting it after seeing itina
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dreaming of visiting it after seeing it in a school atlas when he was a child. now he has travelled to china could to capture these stunning pictures, using a drone. a baby elephant in thailand has been. overcome herfear of elephant in thailand has been. overcome her fear of water by learning to walk again by using hydrotherapy. five—month—old elephant lost part of her foot in a trap which had been laid by villagers. she will need three months of this kind of treatment to help strengthen the muscles in her leg. her vet says she is showing signs of improvement and despite most elephants loving water, she was actually a bit nervous when she first started. but clearly learning, with a harness to make sure she‘s ok. those are the main stories. the weather and sport coming up later on. it‘s nearly six months since chris grayling took office as secretary of state for transport and said his top priority was to sort out southern rail. since then, hundreds of thousands of passengers have endured the misery of numerous strike days —
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and they‘ll face another three of them next week. before we speak to mr grayling, let‘s have a quick reminder of the history of this strike. it‘s the longest—running industrial dispute involving train staff since the railways were privatised in 1996, with the rmt‘s members — mainly conductors — having first walked out in april 2016. the drivers‘ union aslef laterjoined them. passengers have endured 30 days of strike action — with more to come next week. the dispute is over the use of driver—only trains, which are already used on 30% of services. let‘s speak now to the transport secretary chris grayling. good morning. i‘ve spoken to you twice at least, this is the third over the last month. this whole thing is hugely frustrating because as we discovered yesterday, with the
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report from britain‘s leading independent rail safety regulator, the man in charge of safety on our railways, that the system of train dispatch that is being used by southern rail now is safe. therefore there is no reason for this strike to be happening. i‘m as frustrated and irritated as anyone. i‘ve been working behind the scenes for weeks and weeks and weeks, trying to find and weeks and weeks, trying to find a way of getting the unions around ta bles to a way of getting the unions around tables to agree an approach that will settle this dispute. so far neither i nor others involved in doing this have been able to succeed in doing that. i'd love to ask you a question. you admit you have been trying for weeks, what are you going to do differently to solve this with these passengers? now we've got the report yesterday, saying that there isn‘t a safety issue, i‘ve written to the unions again and asked them to the unions again and asked them to suspend the strike is next week. come back round the table. we can
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look at issues around job protection. my view on our railways is that they are facing an unprecedented level of demand, that we are going to need more people not few on our trains and stations, looking after customers on our railways. there is no questions of jobs being cut. i have asked our chief rail safety inspector to look at setting some clear rules for the future about the introduction of new technologies like this. i said to the unions we are happy to look at some detailed transitional arrangements, to see if there are ways of easing the concerns our members have. ultimately our independent safety regulator says the strike fund necessary and the dialogue around the table has been there for weeks and weeks. ultimately i don‘t have the power to force unions to stop striking. i wish i did, but i don‘t. force unions to stop striking. i wish i did, but i don't. but you do have the power at least to talk to
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them. when our talks going to happen? there have been talks happening on and off for weeks. i‘ve met aslef, we‘ve had discussions with acas, direct discussions with the company and the unions. there have been talks after talks after talks. informal, formal. this is the moment, surely, when the unions have to a cce pt moment, surely, when the unions have to accept that the independent view of this strike is that there isn‘t a safety issue. this is surely the moment to come back round the table and sort this out. the start of the ten on that if let‘s see them suspend next week‘s strike action, stop disrupting the lives of passion does, and get this solved. what about southern rail and the way they have handled this? aslef say they have handled this? aslef say they have had constructive relationships with other rail companies which they show tick—macro had shown a better way through. we‘ve talked again about the issues southern rail have
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which have nothing to do with this strike. i have just received the report from chris gibb on what is working and what is not working. it is difficult to deliver change to a railway that is underperforming while the staff are on strike and when they are not on strike, they are working to rule so the trains don‘t run properly either. we need to sort out the long—term problems on this railway line, of which there are still many. thank you for your time. you‘re watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: the us president—elect, donald trump is to meet with intelligence chiefs for a briefing on claims that russia meddled in the american presidential election. as you just heard...
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the train drivers‘ union aslef says it will go ahead with three days of strike action on the southern rail network despite a report which says it is safe for train drivers to operate doors. here‘s the weather now. slightly frosted up car behind me. lots of them around yesterday morning as we saw temperatures below freezing. the difference today. some still seeing the frost. notice, particularly northern ireland, cou nty particularly northern ireland, county down, 15 degrees warmer than it was this time yesterday. the big turnaround but there is a price to pgy- turnaround but there is a price to pay. the high pressure that broke clear skies yesterday has gone to europe and it has allowed the atla ntic europe and it has allowed the atlantic air to come in. with it, cloud and outbreaks of rain. has been a wet morning in northern ireland. things will turn drier through the rest of this morning.
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the heaviest rain clearing eastwards. not a great day across south—west scotland and southern scotla nd south—west scotland and southern scotland seeing outbreaks of rain. a little bit brighter to the east. across the pennines, temperatures on the rise as cloud comes in. but eastern england and west and wales, outbreaks of rain developing during the next few hours and cloud increasing towards much of the southeast midlands. temperatures in oxfordshire are already on the rise. to go with the sunshine in the south—east, fog around. this is where we see the brightest weather throughout the day but more cloud around compared with the blue skies of yesterday. more sunshine around northern scotland. but the rain set in around northern england, west midlands and most of wales and also the south—west. still cold in the south—east and anger, 11 in belfast. temperatures even out tonight. rain
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spreading across southern parts of england through this evening. the cold est england through this evening. the coldest night will be northern scotla nd coldest night will be northern scotland where we will see a touch of frost in the highland glens, but most will have a frost free night tonight and temperatures the south—west may not drop below eight or9 south—west may not drop below eight or 9 degrees. on saturday, the odd spot of rain and drizzle. generally a grey start to the weekend for many. misty over the hills. the exception will be northern scotland where there will be sunny spells after a foggy start. we do it all again into sunday. frost for parts of scotla nd again into sunday. frost for parts of scotland but sunshine in eastern areas and also for eastern england. sunday will be a cloudy day, patchy rain or drizzle sunday will be a cloudy day, patchy rain ordrizzle in sunday will be a cloudy day, patchy rain or drizzle in the west and temperatures above where they should be at this time of year. whilst we experienced temperatures into double figures, spare a thought for those in eastern europe. daytime highs of
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this weekend may only be around minus ten 2—20d. now that is cold! that really is. thank goodness we don‘t have that. if you‘re under 20 years old then you‘re unlikely to have any memory of what happened in new york during the terror attacks of september 11th 2001, so how do you find out the facts behind what happened? that‘s the concern of the labour peer and former first sea lord, admiral lord west. he says events in recent history like 9/11 and 7/7 should be taught in schools to prevent children believing conspiracy theories they may see online. he joins us now from our london newsroom. good morning. what is your concern? as you say, the children in our schools were not born when 9/11 happened. the only way they are getting facts about 9/11, which did change the world. it is the first
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timea change the world. it is the first time a terrorist organisation, with no clear aims time a terrorist organisation, with no clearaims apart time a terrorist organisation, with no clear aims apart from hatred and dislike of other ways of life, went abroad and killed thousands of people. it put us into a different world we are in now. no word do these youngsters get the true facts about this. they go online and there isa about this. they go online and there is a lot of false information. that has been talk about truth, real truth and things like that. the terrorists themselves are online all the time trying to radicalise people. i think it is important youngsters are told about events that day and that is the aim since 9/11, this organisation i am patron of is try to establish that and we have a conference in birmingham coming up onjanuary 27. we are providing free packages of what can be taught, so youngsters, if they produce a good film or clip on their videos and things, or an essay, end
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up videos and things, or an essay, end up going to new york. new york are keen this happens. they feel they are forgotten about the events that happened that day. presumably those who win will say the things you think happened. i am interested to know, that people like you are part of the problem. you are an establishment figure, you are part of the military and people might think they want to challenge the thinking on things. they may think you are part of the problem because they may think you have just accepted things you have been told and not questioned things enough?m is good they challenge things, if it is good they challenge things, if it is taught in schools, it is the opportunity to debate and the the evidence rather than one—sided, nonobjective view. it is a good thing there should be a debate, they should see the evidence laid down
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and see what actually happened that day. i was online the other day and there was nothing saying this was done by american businessmen because it meant they would be able to sell more. when you look that what evidence there was for it, it was just nonsense. i am afraid youngsters look at these things and think there is some truth behind what is being said without actually debating it. they say, that sounds rather good. i think it is a very bad thing. this sort of intolerance and lack of respect for other cultures and ways of living is a really bad thing. by teaching this, iam really bad thing. by teaching this, i am talking about it and there could be some debate and discussion on how important tolerance and respect are if we‘re not going to have dreadful incidents like the things that are happening on a daily basis around the world. can i ask you in relation to today‘s vance, donald trump is going to a meeting with his security officials in
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america. there is a fine line between the notion of conspiracy theory the healthy questioning. people are divided on his approach. he is meeting the cia boss saying how can these officials be so sure, what is going on? there is a place, is there not, for people asking questions for people in those roles. isn‘t that part of what you are talking about? there is a place, and with donald trump, he knows very little about lots of these issues. it is right he should as the question and go and talk about it with the people who have worked in that area all their lives. i have no doubt whatsoever he will come out of that going, goodness me, i didn‘t realise nsa and gchq are one of the few organisations in the world that are capable of getting attribution on where someone has caused some damage. and i have to say, the russians and chinese don‘t realise
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how good we are. it will be valuable for him to understand that and he will come out much wiser and i hope with a number of briefings he will be taught things he did know in the past and will become more aware of what the real position is. that debate is valuable. absolutely right. lord west, thank you for your time. all morning, coletta is out on the water. iam here water. i am here at the london boat show. it is leisurely this friday morning. where would you rather be, paddling around this lake with peter, one of the instructors. it is actually harder than it looks? physically, it
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is because of this time of the morning. you need to get a flexible, have some fun. it is a big industry. boats like there‘s archie, but the industry itself is £3 billion worth to the whole of the uk. it is not just about... 80% of companies are small boat builders. we are about third in the chart when it comes to the amount of turnover and the number of companies based in the uk. it isa number of companies based in the uk. it is a significant industry and one that has been growing for the last five years, by about 1% each year. we have been musing from beautiful boats like this one, to the high—tech end. the super yachts of this world that are high—tech, high—paid jobs. a significant number of people across the uk are employed in this industry as well as people getting involved in it and having a bit of fun. and yes, this see bob
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thing you saw earlier, i am going to get a bit of training and i will get ago get a bit of training and i will get a go later on. coletta, that is going to make my day. one of my favourite things i have seen. good luck with the training. do you think you will get to the underwater bit? but the microphone won‘t work. good luck. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning. it was a frosty start across good morning. it was a frosty start a cross m ost good morning. it was a frosty start across most of the country. rain
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over the next 24 hours. rain coming courtesy of this gaggle of fronts. it has been a wet start. the eastern front slowly moving away southwards and eastwards. it stays dry across east anglia and the south—east. some brightness here but not as much sunshine as yesterday. the rain gradually extending its way down through england and wales. meanwhile it starts to dry up. not much brightness. it will be mild, temperatures up to double figures. temperatures slowly rising across england and wales. temperatures elsewhere will struggle. in some places perhaps no more than 4—5 celsius. the rain will arrive across southern and eastern areas. the odd heavy burst. it will be a murky night with mist and fog. some clear skies developing across scotland and a touch of frost in the highlands.
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otherwise a largely frost free night out there. not as cold tomorrow morning as some of us had this morning. the price we pay is a lot of cloud. it will tend to fade away in most places although some dampness persisting in western areas. the best of the sunshine across parts of scotland, particularly to the east of the high ground. temperatures 5—6, further south a lot milder than it has been. the few places getting up to double figures. into sunday, again after a largely frost free start it will be a dry but cloudy day for many. the best of any brightness further east. this is business live from bbc news with aaron heslehurst and rachel horne. samsung electronics expects to report a 50% surge in fourth quarter profits despite the fiasco with its flagship note 7 phone. live from london, that‘s our top story on friday 6th january. never mind those exploding phones!
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samsung‘s on track for its best profit in years — and pledges to put the galaxy note 7 debacle behind it. and the power of a trump tweet — the president—elect threatens toyota, and the result — $1.2 billion is wiped off the value of the company in less than five minutes.
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